Question: Where Is The Treaty Of Waitangi Now?

How long did it take to write the Treaty of Waitangi?

Two army officers and several missionaries were given responsibility for seeking agreement to the treaty elsewhere in the country.

Several handwritten copies of the Māori-language treaty were taken around the country over the following seven months..

Is the Treaty of Waitangi still valid today?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. Today the Treaty is widely accepted to be a constitutional document that establishes and guides the relationship between the Crown in New Zealand (embodied by our government) and Māori.

What does the Treaty of Waitangi mean to me?

Signed in 1840, Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) is an agreement between some Māori leaders and the Crown. … give Māori full ownership of their lands, forestries, fisheries, taonga (treasures) and possessions. give the Crown exclusive rights to buy Māori land. give sovereignty/governance of New Zealand to …

What did the Treaty of Waitangi do?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Why did Britain want a treaty with New Zealand?

Most signed a Māori-language version. Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

“Currently the formal legal position of the Treaty of Waitangi is that it is legally effective in the New Zealand Courts to the extent that it is recognised in Acts of Parliament. The Treaty of Waitangi has no independent legal status.

What if there was no Treaty of Waitangi?

So: what if there had been no Treaty of Waitangi? … Another easy answer is that with no treaty there would be no argument about whether, in signing the treaty, iwi ceded sovereignty, as the English version says. In the te reo version they didn’t.

What was NZ like before the treaty?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

What happened after the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

Where is the Treaty of Waitangi kept now?

Archives New ZealandThe document is now held at Archives New Zealand in Wellington. In any case, the version signed at Waitangi and copied to London in 1840 is the official treaty, and legally there is only one treaty.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … Pākehā took sides with Māori and were known as ‘philo-Māori’ or Pākehā–Māori.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

What is the importance of a treaty in today’s society?

Treaties form the basis of most parts of modern international law. They serve to satisfy a fundamental need of States to regulate by consent issues of common concern, and thus to bring stability into their mutual relations.