What Are Three Key Principles Of The Treaty Of Waitangi?

How do you honor the Treaty of Waitangi?

Honoring the Treaty can be as simple as supporting treaty education in schools, reading and improving knowledge of nz history, learning te reo or simply making a genuine attempt to say māori names correctly..

What the treaty means today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

Why did the Treaty of Waitangi happen?

Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

When were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

1989Treaty principles developed by the Crown In 1989 the fourth Labour government became the first New Zealand government to set out principles to guide its actions on matters relating to the treaty. These principles were: the government has the right to govern and make laws.

What does the Treaty of Waitangi mean to me?

Signed in 1840, Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) is an agreement between some Māori leaders and the Crown. The three articles of the treaty: give protection, rights and benefits to Māori as British subjects. give Māori full ownership of their lands, forestries, fisheries, taonga (treasures) and possessions.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English. One version of the Treaty was written in Māori and one in English and these two versions of the Treaty can be interpreted to mean different things.

How did the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi come about?

Origins of the principles Because the state-owned enterprises were essentially private firms owned by the government, there was an argument that they would prevent assets which had been given by Māori for use by the state from being returned to Māori by the Waitangi Tribunal and through Treaty settlements.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … These Pākehā were often key ‘go-betweens’, connecting settlers and Māori.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. … The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

What was the result of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

What were the terms of the Treaty of Waitangi?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important today?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.