What Is The Purpose Of Tikanga?

What is the purpose of Whakapapa?

It maps relationships so that mythology, legend, history, knowledge, tikanga (custom), philosophies and spiritualities are organised, preserved and transmitted from one generation to the next.

Whakapapa is the core of traditional mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge).

Whakapapa means genealogy..

What does Tapu and Noa mean?

Tapu (forbidden or restricted) and noa (ordinary or free from restriction) are key Māori cultural concepts that continue to influence and inform present Māori praxis and thinking on all aspects of society, including biowaste management. Traditional management of human waste effluent was highly prescriptive.

Why do we have Whakatau?

Mihi whakatau is the Māori term used to describe a formal speech of welcome and is undertaken by a Māori representative of the University. Mihi whakatau is traditionally used for welcoming, introductions, openings and general purpose which take place off the marae.

What tikanga means?

Tikanga is a Māori concept with a wide range of meanings — culture, custom, ethic, etiquette, fashion, formality, lore, manner, meaning, mechanism, method, protocol, style. Generally taken to mean “the Māori way of doing things”, it is derived from the Māori word tika meaning ‘right’ or ‘correct’.

What does tikanga and kawa mean?

What is Tikanga and Kawa? Te Reo Māori is the kawa. … Kawa is the policy and tikanga are the procedures on how the policy is realised. To put it simply, kawa is what we do, tikanga is how we do it.

What is taonga mean?

Taonga (taoka in South Island Māori) is a Māori language word which refers to a treasured possession in Māori culture. … Intangible examples may include language and spiritual beliefs.

What does tapu mean in English?

spiritual restrictionTapu can be interpreted as ‘sacred’, or defined as ‘spiritual restriction’, containing a strong imposition of rules and prohibitions. A person, object or place that is tapu may not be touched or, in some cases, not even approached.

Why is the head considered Tapu?

Tapu can be interpreted as “sacred” but also “not ordinary”, “special” or even forbidden. It is one of the strongest forces in Māori culture. … That’s why you should avoid sitting on pillows and touching or passing food over a person’s head, since it’s considered very sacred by Māori people.

What is a tikanga practice?

Generally speaking, tikanga are Māori customary practices or behaviours. The concept is derived from the Māori word ‘tika’ which means ‘right’ or ‘correct’ so, in Māori terms, to act in accordance with tikanga is to behave in a way that is culturally proper or appropriate.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Why is a Pepeha important?

Pepeha is a way of introducing yourself in Māori. It tells people who you are by sharing your connections with the people and places that are important to you. It’s like a story that connects you to your waka, your hapū and iwi. It identifies important places like your maunga, awa and marae.

What removes Tapu?

Whakahoro was a ritual to remove tapu from people using water. Another ceremony was hurihanga takapau (turning the mat). This was used by Māui to lift the tapu from his great fish (the North Island).

Why is Ranginui important?

Origin of the celestial bodies. According to Māori myth, Ranginui played a pivotal role in the birth of the sun, moon, planets, stars and constellations – collectively called Te Whānau Mārama (the family of light).

What is tikanga best practice?

Tikanga best practice guidelines was an attempt by New Zealand’s medical professionals to improve the Maori cultural competence of all staff.

What is te ao Māori?

The Māori world view (te ao Māori) acknowledges the interconnectedness and interrelationship of all living & non-living things. The Māori world view (te ao Māori) acknowledges the interconnectedness and interrelationship of all living and non-living things.